Developer's toolkit for Bitcoin Cash continues to grow

Developer’s toolkit for Bitcoin Cash continues to grow

The Bitcoin Cash (BCH) community has seen increasing development activity in recent months, coinciding with rapid development in the technical infrastructure underpinning BCH—the true remaining Bitcoin as envisioned by the Satoshi Nakamoto whitepaper.

The cryptocurrency has already attracted significant interest from wallet providers and exchanges, with numerous other developers working on their own unique protocols derived from the BCH blockchain.

We’ve listed five new, unique development tools available for BCH developers, providing a framework for programmers to contribute their own ideas to developing the BCH ecosystem.

Nakasendo
Early this week, nChain—one of the influential tech groups leading the development of BCH—launched version 1.0 of its Nakasendo software development kit (SDK).

The SDK provides a cryptographic library that will enable more flexible key generation and sharing. The library incorporates nChain’s two patent-pending assets: deterministic key generation and secure split key technique. These two assets will help ensure the security of private keys and digital wallets as a whole, protecting users and businesses from potential Mt. Gox-like attacks.

Nakasendo is available for free usage on Bitcoin Cash blockchain under the nChain Open Bitcoin Cash License. The SDK, however, can be used on any blockchain—or even any type of digital wallet, product, application, where access to a digital asset, resource or communication is needed, according to nChain Group CEO Jimmy Nguyen.

Coinbase CashAddr support for Ruby apps

On Tuesday, Coinbase engineer Josh Ellithorpe announced on Twitter the launch of his open source project, which is a Bitcoin Cash CashAddr library for the Ruby coding language.

The project describes itself as a “library to convert between base58 and CashAddr BCH addresses,” essentially making it easier for Ruby software developers to implement the CashAddr format. CashAddr is a serialization protocol for naming addresses within the Bitcoin Cash network makes the addresses distinctively recognizable, and, in the process, helps avoid human errors as well as provide extensions for future functionalities currently being developed for the network.

Flowee

Flowee provides an interface between the BCH network and external apps, via its simple API. The technology allows for interactions between applications and the Bitcoin BCH blockchain, providing the rails for developers to bring their ideas to BCH.

The Flowee team describes their technology as ‘the lowest level of the stack’, which powers top-level applications that interact with the BCH blockchain, saying: “In the hub, we process all those bitcoin data structures and as such, this is the lowest level of the stack where end-user bitcoin applications make the top-level of the stack.”

The open source project’s hub offers a network-based API that enables “fast processing of huge amounts of data in a bi-directional manner.”

“A quick example is that a tool can connect to the Hub and subscribe to a specific bitcoin address. The connection stays open and when a payment comes in for that address the hub will send a notification to the user,” according to the Flowee website.

BitBox

An alternative to Flowee in providing the essential building blocks for BCH applications is BitBox. BitBox allows developers to create applications in single commands, with dozens of different utility methods at developers’ disposal.

It allows anyone to simply create their own BCH blockchain, for development, testing and experimentation, as well as providing an effective mechanism for building blockchain apps.

According to their introductory text, “the command line utility lets you quickly stub out an application with web bindings and tests as well as a console with the entire BCH RPC available.

“Your own Bitcoin Cash blockchain to configure however you choose. This blockchain is created from scratch each time you start Bitbox. It doesn’t connect to the real network and only consists of transactions and blocks which you create locally so it’s quick and responsive. Execute commands from the command line and client/server.”

bitcoin.J.cash Protocol

Created by a fork from the original bitcoin.j protocol, bitcoin.J.cash allows developers to write code compatible with the web and HTML, in what is fast becoming one of the favoured methods of developing for BCH.

The codebase is easy to use, and allows for a sandbox wallet for both send and receive, without requiring a full node implementation. As such, it’s arguably the most lightweight method of developing applications for the technology.

The library’s readme text was quoted by news.bitcoin.com saying: “This project implements Bitcoin Cash signature algorithm. It is based on bitcoin.j and forked from PR-1422.”

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit-Coin BTC (inaccurately called Bitcoin Legacy or Core by many) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.
CashAddr support coming to Trezor

CashAddr support coming to Trezor

As Bitcoin Cash continues to gain popularity, more and more entities are rolling out acceptance of the fourth-largest cryptocurrency. Last week, BitPay announced that it would accept BCH as a payment method by retailers. Now, cryptocurrency wallet provider Trezor looks to be preparing to roll out a much-needed service, the switch to the CashAddr format for BCH.

The announcement didn’t come through official Trezor channels, but has been confirmed by developers.  Last Friday, a Twitter user posed the question, “…Any ETA on when we can expect CashAddr Security on the Trezor?” Shortly after, user @_xbach responded by saying, “No ETA, but the cashaddr support is being developed.” He went on to include a thread on GitHub where developers are discussing the CashAddr issue. That thread can be found here.

The CashAddr format was designed to help differentiate BCH from legacy Bitcoin (BTC). Both shared similar formats when BCH split from BTC, leading to possible confusion and mistakes when sending funds from one platform to another. Since addressing formats determine the route a transaction takes, there existed the possibility that a BCH transaction ended up going to a BTC destination.

As indicated, there is no mention of when CashAddr will be implemented, but it will certainly be a welcome addition to the wallet. In addition to BitPay, Coinbase, Hitbtc, Stash Wallet and others have already made the switch. Coinbase transferred to the new format in February of this year.

Software cryptocurrency wallets are relatively easy to redesign for the CashAddr format. However, hardware wallets require more work. Trezor is one such wallet, using a USB dongle to sign cryptocurrency transactions with the user’s private key, which is generated offline.

Trezor supports all major cryptocurrencies, including BTC, BCH, DASH and Ethereum (through the MyEtherWallet), among others. Because it’s a hardware wallet, it provides an added layer of security to protect cryptocurrency investments. All private keys are stored, and confirmed, in the device, and not on the Internet. Even if the wallet is connected to a compromised computer, the private keys cannot be seen or stolen.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.

source: https://coingeek.com/cashaddr-support-coming-trezor/

Trezor won't support CashAddr

Trezor won’t support CashAddr, cites backend compatibility issues

Whenever there’s a new thing around the block, everyone turns their heads to see what’s up. When the new CashAddr format was introduced by Bitcoin ABC to the Bitcoin Cash community, it was received with warmth and gratitude. However, not everyone in the community felt the same way.

Hardware wallet companies like Ledger, KeepKey, and Trezor are major brands which most users in the Bitcoin Cash community trust and rely on for their daily needs. While the first two have been quick to upgrade their products’ software and accommodate the new CashAddr format designed specifically for Bitcoin Cash, the latter hassuggested that they may never support it.

According to a Trezor developer, their hardware wallets won’t provide support for CashAddr’s Bitcoin Cash new address protocol, an upgrade which secures BCH addresses from both human and machine error while also providing extended functionality.

In a Reddit thread, u/stickac, CTO and developer at Trezor cited backend compatibility as an issue affecting their decision: “This will break compatibility with most of the existing systems, which will make it even less interesting for merchants, users, etc. Lead developer is totally ignoring feedback from experts in the industry creating more and more mess,” adding that “the proposed change for Cash is non-standard and non-trivial and frankly, so we won’t be rushing into supporting that one.”

The developer’s response was met with petitions from Bitcoin Cash users for the company to reconsider.

“I like the wallet but it’s kind of ridiculous you’re not even going to try,” said u/kikimonster. u/keo604 shared the concern, saying, “We’re Trezor resellers (just received another batch of 25 Trezors) and our customers are primarily BCH users. Please support the new address format. Thank you.”

Another user expressed disdain over Trezor’s apparent unwillingness to adapt to the upgrade. “Every time I see these (this) decision, instead of ‘we are open to every opportunity’, I get frustrated,” said u/koalalorenzo.

Bach Nguyen, a community manager from Trezor, recently tweeted: “It’s much less about consulting us, but more about consensus. There are three different address formats for Bitcoin Cash right now. Let’s wait until the dust settles so we don’t see a fourth one.”

It’s important to note that even before the new address format was implemented, the community and the decentralized team of developers working on the Bitcoin Cash network first formed a consensus before reaching the decision. Updates like the CashAddr are designed to ensure a seamless and secure experience for the Bitcoin Cash community. If the problem is identified as a backend issue, what the Trezor development team may do for its Bitcoin Cash users is to release an unofficial nightly build to test the dependencies surrounding CashAddr. If it compiles and runs well with BCH user’s devices, they might have to retract their statement and support the new protocol upgrade after all.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true  Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.
Widespread adoption of Cashaddr format spurs upgrades

Widespread adoption of Cashaddr format spurs upgrades, new tools

As the Bitcoin Cash network heads into a new phase of maturity, its community and developers continue to work on a set of new features that would improve Bitcoin Cash users’ experience. One of the new features that the network’s users may now utilize is the new address format named ‘Cashaddr.’

This new serialization protocol for naming addresses within the Bitcoin Cash network makes the addresses distinctively recognizable. This feature helps avoid human errors as well as provide extensions for future functionalities currently being developed for the network. Machine errors like sending BCH to a legacy BTC address may also be avoided with the protocol’s internal verification.

Since it was introduced and officially implemented two weeks ago, the Cashaddr format has attracted several businesses and service providers that support the Bitcoin Cash network, with some organizations promising future upgrades while they study its impact on their products. However, this new implementation was also met with some friction by hardware wallet companies that have decided to update P2PKH and P2SH address versions while keeping the same format or reuse Bech32-based encoding for their wallets. Other hardware wallets companies are of the opinion that the protocol update will “break compatibility with most of the existing systems, which will make it even less interesting for merchants, users, etc.”

Despite these varying reactions from the cryptocurrency industry, the Bitcoin Cash community has adjusted to the upgrade in BCH infrastructure, remaining steadfast to its vision of unrestricted growth, global adoption, permissionless innovation, and decentralized development. All Cashaddr addresses are linked to a “legacy address” in the Bech32 format, and the changes with the prefix and notation won’t affect a user’s private and public keys.

At the time of writing, integrations with the new Bitcoin Cash Cashaddr address format have been implemented with wallets and exchanges like Bitcoin.com, BitPay and Copay, Coinomi, Coinbase, Electron Cash, Blockchain.info, Stash Wallet, and BTC.com wallet; full node implementations like Bitcoin ABC and Bitcoin Unlimited, as well as block explorers like Bitcoin.com’s new BCH tool, Blockchair, and Blockdozer. Announcements from mobile-based clients like Unit have listed the address protocol upgrade in their future roadmaps.

Shapeshift.io, the exchange company which also owns KeepKey, a hardware wallet brand, has not issued any statement addressing user requests for the new implementation. As of writing, the firmware for KeepKey’s hardware wallets has already been upgraded.

Asked whether this new implementation had a one-to-one mapping protocol, Bitcoin ABC’s developers stated that “any legacy Bitcoin address format will convert to one and only one Cashaddr format, and the same is true in reverse. So there will always be two versions (legacy and Cashaddr) of any given address, and they are interchangeable because they correspond to the same set of private and public keys.”

Adoptions of the new format has spread swiftly in the Bitcoin Cash ecosystem, with some wallets allowing users to simply toggle between the legacy format (based on Bech32) and the new Cashaddr format. In case users get confused, Bitcoincash.org has provided a simple tool for converting between the two formats. For offline use, the Electron Cash 3.1 client also has a built-in Bitcoin Cash address converter.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true  Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.
CashAddr developers introduce Vanitygen for Bitcoin Cash

CashAddr developers introduce Vanitygen for Bitcoin Cash

With an ever-increasing demand for Bitcoin Cash causing some recent confusion about cryptocurrencies, making identifiably unique addresses for BCH users has become a necessary measure for security reasons. A new implementation of Vanitygen is now live, specifically serving the growing number of Bitcoin Cash users.

Vanitygen Cash, a BCH address generator that can be run through a terminal, is a project of the same developers behind the new Bitcoin Cash address format. If you’ve ever wanted to have a cryptocurrency address that you can truly call your own, this is what you need.

To a beginner, cryptocurrency address formats often appear as a bunch of confusing letters and numbers. With the use of an address generator like Vanitygen Cash, Bitcoin Cash users can create and compile personalized addresses. A “flair” or unique identifier can be appended to an address as a prefix. Vanitygen Cash can also be used to create a random address if used offline. The new implementation is useful for Bitcoin Cash users who want a simple way of making their BCH addresses easier to read and identify.

The binaries for Vanitygen Cash work by accepting a pattern as an input or by receiving a set of patterns which it will then search for, producing a list of addresses and private keys based in the initial input. Because it is based on the same codebase as the first implementation, Vanitygen Cash retains a probabilistic character for its search engine. The speed of the search result’s distribution depends on the user’s host machine, as well as the complexity of the pattern placed as an input.

Here’s an example of how Vanitygen Cash works from a terminal:

Notice that the pattern becomes an additional prefix for the generated address. The private key remains the same. Hence, it works as a unique “wrapper” for the address to become easily identifiable at a glance, extending the practicality of the CashAddr format for Bitcoin Cash. While there are web-based applications such as Vante.me that do the same thing, these web generators are outdated as they only accept legacy bitcoin addresses using the old formats Pay-to-PubkeyHash (P2PKH) and Pay to script hash (P2SH).

The source code for Vanitygen Cash is compliant with AGPL v3. For Mac users, the build takes about 50 minutes to fully install. OS X and Linux users share the same makefile, while Windows users may run it with Win32. The new implementation’s compiled binaries are publicly available for download at Github.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.
CashAddr address format for Bitcoin Cash goes live

CashAddr address format for Bitcoin Cash goes live

After a series of pre-release evaluations, Bitcoin ABC has finally released its new software version, 0.16.2. The update now includes the CashAddr Address Format, a new encoding of the previous format which followed the SegWit1x (BTC), also known as old legacy Bitcoin, address format.

First proposed in October, the new address format is a base32 encoded format using BCH codes as checksum. The format accommodates direct hyperlinks and QR codes for cross-device and print compatibility. It reuses the code for Bech32 and retains certain aspects of its master branch.

What’s different about the CashAddr format is with how it uses a visual cue to help users distinguish between BTC addresses and Bitcoin Cash addresses at a glance. The CashAddr format now uses a semantic prefix. The prefix [bitcoincash] indicates the network on which the address is recognized as valid, in this case the main net. The prefixes [bchtest] and [bchreg] are also deployed for the bitcoin cash testnet and regtest, respectively.

Bitcoin ABC encourages all Bitcoin Cash users to update to the new format, though this falls under their discretion, as wallet incompatibility errors may occur. A way to work around this is by using an address converter tool. Bitcoin ABC recommends using bitcoincash.org’s trusted converter tool. Using other reliable converters such as Electron Cash 3.1 is also recommended to avoid any malicious attempts to point transactions to other addresses.

Using the legacy address similar to BTC’s format will still work, however, the new address format has better security features, according to Bitcoin ABC. The old format will soon be deprecated and become archived as a base format. Beneath the new encoding, the raw public key hash (pubkeyHash) for each Bitcoin Cash user’s wallet is retained. The new format is case-insensitive, making it easier for users to type and communicate. The format is also open and extensible, giving it a space for modularity and compatibility for future functionalities appended to the Bitcoin Cash ecosystem.

Aside from the added security features and there’s no significant difference as the new format is just a new kind of encoding, Bitcoin Cash users will still experience the same fast, low-cost, and secure transactions.

The Bitcoin Cash development community formed this consensus to create a new type of address format in order to reduce errors and confusion. Given the performance of Bitcoin Cash since its launch as a cryptocurrency designed according to Satoshi Nakamoto’s vision of cost-efficient peer-to-peer transactions, this upgrade comes as a welcome change for the growing community.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true  Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper.  Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.

Bitcoin Cash to introduce new address format to avoid confusion between BTC and BCH addresses

The new address format seems to be gearing up for even bigger plans.

Because the legacy chain (BTC) and Bitcoin Cash (BCH) share a common address format to date, it has caused confusion and resulted in some users losing their money after sending BTC to a BCH address, and vice versa. In an effort to put an end to this problem, Bitcoin ABC’s lead developer Amaury Séchet is proposing a new address format for BCH, one that will make it incompatible with the BTC chain.

According to Séchet, the new address format, called cashaddr, not only helps end the confusion. It also prepares the Bitcoin Cash system for further upgrades in the future, including multiparty smart contracts.

“Using a new format will prevent users from mistakenly sending money on the wrong chain. It also accept payloads up to 512 bits which ensures we can deploy more secure way of doing multiparty smart contract in the future. Finally, it uses a version field ensuring we can encode new features in these addresses in the future without having to use a new format.”

In addition, the upgrade incorporates some advanced improvements to the original address format. He says that the new address is more compatible with QR code encoding, and would be faster to decode and encode, which would come in handy when processing large volumes of addresses. A very strong checksum also safeguards from more errors.

The upgrade can be implemented easily and does not need a hard fork. Séchet is targeting a January 14 deployment—which is perfect as it avoids the Christmas holiday season, when transactions may be at its peak, while also being ahead of another holiday season, the Chinese new year which falls in February.

Séchet urges wallets and exchanges to deploy the upgrade shortly in order to “stop the fragmentation of the ecosystem,” citing a temporary fix employed by Bitpay that uses an incompatible address format. While it was understandable that they had to find a temporary solution to keep their users from losing money over the confusion between BTC and BCH addresses, it will no longer be necessary once cashaddr is implemented.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper. Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.

Bitcoin Cash to introduce new address format to avoid confusion between BTC and BCH addresses

The new address format seems to be gearing up for even bigger plans.

Because the legacy chain (BTC) and Bitcoin Cash (BCH) share a common address format to date, it has caused confusion and resulted in some users losing their money after sending BTC to a BCH address, and vice versa. In an effort to put an end to this problem, Bitcoin ABC’s lead developer Amaury Séchet is proposing a new address format for BCH, one that will make it incompatible with the BTC chain.

According to Séchet, the new address format, called cashaddr, not only helps end the confusion. It also prepares the Bitcoin Cash system for further upgrades in the future, including multiparty smart contracts.

“Using a new format will prevent users from mistakenly sending money on the wrong chain. It also accept payloads up to 512 bits which ensures we can deploy more secure way of doing multiparty smart contract in the future. Finally, it uses a version field ensuring we can encode new features in these addresses in the future without having to use a new format.”

In addition, the upgrade incorporates some advanced improvements to the original address format. He says that the new address is more compatible with QR code encoding, and would be faster to decode and encode, which would come in handy when processing large volumes of addresses. A very strong checksum also safeguards from more errors.

The upgrade can be implemented easily and does not need a hard fork. Séchet is targeting a January 14 deployment—which is perfect as it avoids the Christmas holiday season, when transactions may be at its peak, while also being ahead of another holiday season, the Chinese new year which falls in February.

Séchet urges wallets and exchanges to deploy the upgrade shortly in order to “stop the fragmentation of the ecosystem,” citing a temporary fix employed by Bitpay that uses an incompatible address format. While it was understandable that they had to find a temporary solution to keep their users from losing money over the confusion between BTC and BCH addresses, it will no longer be necessary once cashaddr is implemented.

Note: Tokens in the SegWit chain are referred to as SegWit1X (BTC) and SegWit Gold (SWG) and are no longer Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) is the only true Bitcoin as intended by the original Satoshi white paper. Bitcoin BCH is the only public block chain that offers safe and cheap microtransactions.