Top Financial Directors to receive free Bitcoin incentive

CoinGeek.com have sent the Financial Directors of 20 top (mostly) online retail brands, who do not currently accept Bitcoin, er, $100 of Bitcoin via a QR code. This experiment is designed to understand the views of the decision-makers at the top brands about Bitcoin and, hopefully, encourage some to actually take the plunge.

It is important to state that many of important global retailers are already on board including: Starbucks, Subway, Dell, Expedia, Overstock.com and Microsoft and eluded in this video.

So the CoinGeek team thought they’d offer the carrot to other brands as yet not on-board, namely: Alibaba, Amazon, Tesco, Staples, Uber, MacDonald’s, Netflix, Airbnb, American Airlines, LVMH, AT&T, CVS Health, Tesla, Apple, FedEx, John Lewis PLC, Spotify, BMW and Red Bull.

It is a very simple experiment and it will be fascinating to see who takes up the offer and who does not, after all its free money, right?

We’ll keep you posted.

The Problem With Sidechains & Craig Wright’s View Too

The battle rages on but, worse, two sides become more. In a recent article Jimmy Song suggests yet another alternative via sidechains. The problem? Put simply this is, basically, a return to banking as we know it. His argument, and that of sidechains, is that in allowing a fractional reserve Bitcoin, there is more for all:

This removes scarcity which kills Bitcoin, in allowing bitcoin to be a marker, we just go back to what we have and Bitcoin loses value.

As we have Dr Craig Wright’s ear we put the issue of sidechains to him and were delighted to he they bring to the Bitcoin table (bar basic human greed). He commented:

“Sidechains are Bitcoin’s inflation model. They enable those who like, want or understand scarcity to undermine Bitcoin and slowly erode its value.

This should be expected. A lot of developers do not have a strong understanding of economics, and in fact, believe it to be irrelevant. This is how the groups who want inflation gain control. A slow, insidious cancer that changes Bitcoin from the hard money system it is and into something the powers that be know, understand and can then control.”

He signed off with: “SegWit today… seigniorage next…” (Yes, we had to look that one up too).

Thomson Reuters Plans Blockchain Smart Contracts System

Multinational media giant Thomson Reuters has become the latest company to announce it is experimenting with blockchain technology.

The group, which owns a number of high-profile media brands globally, is to open its data to smart contract developers, based on the ethereum blockchain and the R3 consortium’s flagship Corda DLT protocol, in a move that could deliver significant efficiency gains and cost savings for the company.

Dubbed BlockOne IQ, the platform, which was released in beta for the first time today, will enable smart contracts with secure financial information, effectively removing the need for a middleman across a range of transactions.

Participants will be able to use the technology to take advantage of Thomson Reuters’ reputation for providing current, accurate financial information, including across exchange rates, securities pricing and other key benchmarks.

Thomson Reuters has elected to make wide sets of financial data available on the system, in a bid to explore whether the system could become helpful in a range of equity actions like paying dividends, without the need for the same level of human oversight and administration.

While the system remains in the earliest stages of its development, smart contract authors have already met the project with enthusiasm, in recognition of the potentially significant benefits this type of technology could hold in store.

Blockchain technology was originally conceived of as having the most significant impact on financial services, with banking and currency at the forefront of the initial waves of development.

However, technologies like smart contracts open up the distributed ledger to a range of other industries, including sectors as diverse as energy, agriculture, logistics and gun control.

While much of the same data has previously been made available for centralised systems, via APIs and FTP links, the BlockOne IQ project represents the first time Thomson Reuters has opened its data flows to smart contracts.

The company has said it intends to extend access to the data to blockchain consortia, including the leading open source Hyperledger project, which has pooled the efforts of over a hundred of the world’s biggest companies to explore the implications of the blockchain.

Sam Chadwick of Thomson Reuters said that this would enable greater experimentation on the system, both from large banks and institutions, as well as from startups in the blockchain space.

“Although we’ve got a bias towards the large banks experimenting, some of the smaller firms just in the crypto-space are very interesting to us as well.”

Craig Wright Interview Part 1 – An Introduction

Editor Note: This is the first in a multiple-part series of interviews with Craig Wright, conducted by guest columnist Eli Afram.

In the last few days, I have been involved in a rather extended interview with Dr Craig Wright, who for various reasons has been cast into the spotlight, initially when Gizmodo and Wired both decided to “invade” his “private life” and then later again when he provided cryptographic proofs to Gavin Andresen and Jon Matonis identifying him as Satoshi Nakamoto. But he withdrew from presenting similar evidence to the public.

Despite what has been said of him in the media, and the countless click-bait publications, I personally found my interaction with Craig (who insisted I refer to him on a first-name basis) to be very professional, friendly, and personable.

Wright has been out of public view for a little while now, but he explained to me that he is feeling ready to come out again into public life in the near future.

Our interaction is heading to be a multi-day interview, and he has already provided me with countless bits of valuable information which I will sift through and share in the coming weeks. But initially, I wanted to start with the simple open-ended questions to get the ball rolling. Much has been said in the media, and I wanted to give Wright an opportunity to explain matters from his perspective.

Wright explained that over the last two years his life had changed significantly. He went from being an obscure businessman and academic, to suddenly being thrust into the limelight. “It wasn’t something I handled very well at first, but then I never saw how attacks on my family could be warranted” he said.

“I am slowly coming to terms with having to deal with many, many, people. As an academic, I limited my teaching to postgraduate level mathematics and computer science for the most part. The result was I never really had to grow or learn to interact with many people. For the most part, it would be small groups that I’d know well” explained Wright.

“You’re asking who is Dr Craig Wright today. I am more focused and am slowly learning to interact with people better. On that I need to particularly thank my wife and those friends who still put up with me. I still love study, and at present I am doing the last subject needed to complete my Masters in Science and econometrics from University of London at the moment. As soon as I complete that I shall be starting another PhD.”

He went on to clarify how the majority of his attention has been particularly involved in information security and added “Many of my battles come from a philosophical perspective” – ironically, he does have a doctorate in philosophy – both CoinGeek and myself have verified this, but his point in this instance was interesting – “For the last 15 years I’ve been arguing that the key to information security is not tools or toys but is economics.”

“Cryptography is a tool. Used correctly, it helps in the creation of secure systems. But like every tool, it comes as a cost risk trade-off. Bitcoin like all secure systems is structured from an economic risk trade-off. Too many people in the community do not seem to understand that it is the economics of the system that make it strong, not the algorithms. Set well, financial incentives create a strong system. There are no absolutes and there is nothing perfect in this world. When we accept that we can progress. When we fight it, we spin our wheels and get nowhere.”

Wright shared with me much of his work. Countless research papers, and academic works … a lot of which I am still going through and trying to get my head around.  Interestingly, some of this research involved the very functional elements which are used in Bitcoin today.

One thing for certain, he left no doubts in my mind that he is indeed someone who “loves to gain knowledge” as he concluded with:

“To answer who I am, a man who cares about my family and who loves to gain knowledge. That has made me somewhat isolated in many aspects. Cannot say that I am a terribly social person but the last couple years have been learning exercise. Never hoped to be thrust into the position I am now in. I like the research I’m doing and I love having the opportunity to build systems, software and mathematics.”

Eli Afram
Twitter: @justicemate

European Commission Launches Study Group For Non-Financial Blockchain Applications

The European Commission has today announced it is launching a study group to investigate potential use cases for blockchain technology across the bloc.

The Commission, which acts as the European Union’s executive, announced the #Blockchain4EU project would run through to February 2018, under the directorship of the Joint Research Centre and the Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs.

The Joint Research Centre will draw on expertise from technical, academic and business sectors, including at both a national and supranational level.

The involvement of the Directorate-Generale will drive the commercial agenda of the research project, investigating the implications for business and the wider EU internal market.

The project will aim to research particular applications for the emerging technology, while engaging stakeholders in discussions about how the EU might make use of blockchain technology and the resulting process gains in future.

It follows from a similar announcement in the last couple of months that saw the EU commit €500,000 to broader pilot projects, designed to increase technical understanding of distributed ledger technology and its potential implications for governance and commerce.

When the project was initially announced, MEP Jakob von Weizsäcker stressed the importance of the Commission increasing its support for blockchain projects and research.

“The Commission is already supporting DLT-enabled projects (DECODE, D-Cent, MyHealth MyData). Support activities are going to increase in the coming months (e.g. Decentralised Data Management). A study will be launched to investigate how DLT can help in reshaping public services and preparing for EU specific DLT actions to address relevant EU challenges.”

The news will be welcomed by those in public administration across the EU, as well as further afield, with countries around the world investigating their own applications for the blockchain and distributed ledger technology.

The tech behind cryptocurrencies like blockchain and ethereum, DLT also has a huge range of potential non-financial applications, which are to become the focus of the Commission’s research and development efforts over the coming months.

The study will aim to explore the advantages and drawbacks of this technology for the future, with a particular focus on implications for small and medium sized businesses.

Bitcoin: Something Has to Give

While many Bitcoiners out there are thoroughly enjoying this bull market, and of course a rising price is a sign of positive sentiment, it must be stated that all other indicators don’t look so good. Bitcoin’s price may very well continue to swell in the near future, but have a look at Bitcoin’s market cap dominance among cryptos, and suddenly it’s not a pretty picture.

Bitcoin: Something Has to Give
Bitcoin’s market cap dominance among cryptos

The era of Bitcoin superiority is quickly coming to an end. Ethereum is likely poised to take the market cap crown, but there’s no guarantee, particularly with the fast emergence of other coins also gaining on Bitcoin’s losses.

If we look at today’s numbers, Bitcoin would be valued over $5000 USD per coin had it not been for its diminishing network effect.

Rising fees are an issue.

One myth that needs to be quashed is that Segregated Witness is a scaling solution. Segwit’s scaling capability is completely dependant on a fully implemented Lightning Network, something which has not yet been deployed holistically. The otherwise mild blocksize increase that Segwit does offer is not enough to correct today’s congestion issues.

Today, I firmly believe that Bitcoin’s rising prices are simply due to the investment opportunity. Good things in life start at the most common denominator. If you cannot transfer $10 without paying half of that value in fees, then users will easily use another coin for that transaction.

People often compare changing coins to the network effect of social media networks. It’s not the same sport. In crypto-land, you don’t need to transfer all your photos, media, friends, followers, and everything else onto a new system. You simply download a new wallet, and use it.

Adam Back CEO of Blockstream recently tweeted that he bets “they’d” pay $100 per transaction. Key word “they”. Clearly, Adam is not a user of the very system he is supposedly care-taking.

Bitcoin: Something Has to Give

Bruce Fenton replies with a similar comment, and reaffirms Bitcoin’s large, secure ledger. But what happens when Ethereum reaches the same “secure, large ledger”. By what rationale will people use Bitcoin, and lose $20 per transaction over Bitcoin?

Its no secret, Blockstream employees openly say fees are a good thing. Gavin Andresen, the man who was entrusted by Satoshi to carry on the development of Bitcoin following his departure, recently stated “I was wrong, stay away from Blockstream…”.

Unless you are compromised, you’d have a hard time not seeing the blatant attack on Bitcoin, and the resulting effect.

I recently put out a small sample survey asking people if they thought that if another coin was to take the mantle off Bitcoin, would the next coin suffer similar attacks. Overwhelmingly people responded with ‘Yes’.

So I ask myself, if Bitcoin is intentionally being crippled, would these same entities that are pulling strings put the same resources into attacking yet another coin, and then yet another coin, and another coin, in an endless spiral? It’s a question to ponder.

But here we are nearing the moment of the ‘fippening’; When another coin takes the throne. And it will happen – unless the community becomes one voice, and miners hear them.

Admittedly I’ll be disheartened should Blockstream win this war. Because it will be a win for oppression, a win for centralized governance, and it will be a loss for people, and a loss for those with a voice.

Eli Afram
@justicemate

UC Berkeley Announces Plans For Health Research Blockchain

UC Berkeley has today announced it has collaborated with blockchain firm Bitmark to create two separate research studies to be powered by distributed ledger technology.

Concerning sharing medical records and public health administration respectively, the projects are to be funded by the startup, with researchers from the university teaming up to bring these models to life.

The news follows recently confirmed funding for Bitmark, with some $1.7 million secured from a range of investors and industry partners.

The first study will see patients submitting personal information about their diabetes, specifically their remission, while the second study is being set up to examine whether patients feel comfortable contributing sensitive health information via the technology.

UC Berkeley is no stranger to working with blockchain development, with the University having established their own student-led blockchain development group in the recent past.

Yet the details of these two trials will be met with anticipation from the wider health industry, thought to be a potentially significant beneficiary from developments in the technology.

According to a statement issued by the University, the research partnership will provide excellent opportunities for their students, as well as helping furthering the aims of syncing public health with emerging distributed ledger technologies.

“The School of Public Health at UC Berkeley is excited to partner with Bitmark Inc on this research fellowship. It is a great opportunity for our young researchers to gain valuable hands-on experience at the intersection of public health and technology.”

The University sector has been reflecting a growing uptake in blockchain development, with students and academics acknowledging the potential tied up in this technology.

Some academics took to the stage at this year’s Consensus conference to discuss the growing interest in the technology, alongside concerns that it is nearly impossible to teach blockchain development at the current rapid rate of change and development.

With clear use cases across a number of industries aside from health care, including banking and finance, energy, shipping and agriculture, blockchain technology is widely recognized for having disruptive potential to a huge range of business and public sector processes.

The projects being delivered by UC Berkeley in conjunction with Bitmark are the latest in a series of similar research efforts already underway, with leading academics keen to focus on research and development of the tech.

Western Union Unveils Plans For Coinbase Hookup

Global payments company Western Union has today unveiled plans that will see it develop an implementation of existing services with Coinbase, one of the world’s most prominent cryptocurrency exchanges.

The pilot was announced by Western Union’s CTO David Thompson at an event in Madrid this week. Distinguished by his own career, which has involved mining bitcoin directly, the news only added to the hype in the aftermath of his presentation.

While discussions focused on whether the blockchain will ultimately come to replace the remittance sector, something Thompson believes is unlikely in the long term, his nevertheless positive approach to the underlying technology can be interpreted as another vote of confidence in the blockchain.

The news follows on from a previously unsuccessful trial arranged by Western Union in partnership with Ripple. While uptake on that pilot was lower than Western Union expected, the newly announced pilot with the Coinbase infrastructure seeks to streamline key compliance processes as part of the financial industry’s know-your-customer obligations (KYC).

However, while the trial will look at the potential of the technology for Western Union’s business, digital currencies will remain excluded from any eventual platform. According to David Thompson, this could only be considered after the regulatory picture around digital currencies has fully materialized.

“Until digital currencies become regulated and integrated into the law, we are not going to include that on the platform. Our regulators are quite direct with us; it’s not something they are allowing us to enable.”

The project will be monitored closely by financial businesses with KYC obligations to fulfill. Currently a complex and bureaucratic process facing businesses onboarding new customers, it is thought that in the case of Western Union alone there are savings of up to $240 million annually available from this type of technology.

A blockchain-based solution should be able to make it easier for companies to automate these processes, reducing much of the costly administrative burden they face at present.

Smart contracts and real-time payment settlement are other areas the firm intends to explore through its experimentations with the blockchain.

It comes at a time when financial service firms, central banks and regulators across the world are turning to the technology, which many believe could hold fundamental reforms of the global financial system in the years to come.

Energy Firms Complete Successful BTL Group Blockchain Trial

BP and Wein Energy are amongst a group of energy firms to today announce the successful conclusion of an important blockchain trial.

The pilot program was designed to facilitate energy trading, and is one of the leading blockchain pilots in the industry.The 12-week trial was run by Canadian startup BTL on their Interbit protocol, with support from Big Four professional services firm EY.

As one of the major participants in the trial, Wein Energie has celebrated the completion of this first stage, which it feels could provide a working model for a larger scale roll-out of the underlying blockchain technology.

Similarly, the trial has been watched by others in the industry, with several energy companies in the process of exploring blockchain technology.

CEO of BTL, and the firm’s co-founder, Guy Halford-Thompson, said the trial’s success can now inspire the next phase of development, towards the first successful deployment of this kind of solution in the energy sector.

“At BTL we truly believe that, by using blockchain technology and our proprietary platform, Interbit, there is a better and more efficient way for enterprises to build applications. Having demonstrated the reductions in risk and cost savings that are achievable we now have an opportunity to deliver the first successful blockchain based application to the energy market.”

“We are very passionate about the innovation that our technology can achieve in the energy sector and welcome new participants to join us and other leading global energy companies in the next phase of development, via this open invitation.”

It comes fresh from a separate announcement that a group of energy companies were pulling together to form a new consortium, specifically tasked with examining potential use cases for the technology within the energy sector.
The energy industry is one of many thought to be an eventual beneficiary of blockchain technology, with some significant use cases already in the works – including blockchains that tackle green energy issues, and a number of administrative functions.

The success of the BTL trial, which also included companies such as BP, will be welcomed by industry partners and stakeholders, many of whom have their own proposals for leveraging the blockchain in future.

 

 

Recommended Bitcoin Fees Cross $3 per Transaction

I’m going to be straight out honest here. This is only going to get worse. And there is one group solely responsible for this – Blockstream’s Core developers.

Increasing capacity is such a simple flick of a switch, but Bitcoin Core developers insist that any such change would require six months of testing, and will require a ‘contentious’ hardfork, and all other forms of varying lies. And the reason that flicking this switch has become almost impossible is because some people, sadly, believe them.

It is by its sheer first mover advantage that Bitcoin remains a king among cryptos to date. While developers of other cryptocurrencies have taken the obvious moves of increasing on-chain capacity as a first measure, Bitcoin remains trapped in a Jurassic age of a 1MB artificial limit, causing dangerous congestions.

It was over 90% of the DASH community that agreed to hardfork to a 2MB. There was nothing ‘dangerous’ about that hardfork whatsoever. Despite all the rhetoric we hear from Core’s echo chambers about how ‘dangerous’ a hardfork is.

Newcomers, hardforks may sound scary, but this is how upgrades are done in the land of cryptos. In my many debates I’ve been told “Oh, but Bitcoin has a much bigger marketcap, and is much riskier to hardfork”, which is a ridiculous argument. Funny that Ethereum has half of the Market Cap that Bitcoin has (and much more than BTC had last year), and yet the Ethereum community is certainly not afraid to deploy a series of hardforks to correct any matters that require attention.

Other coins are even more adventurous, such as Monero, having a dynamic blocksize which adjusts organically with demand – it’s not rocket science to ease capacity. The problems of the network today could have been resolved years ago, had the warning signs been heeded.

It’s time to call the lies, and ignore the endless rhetoric that comes from the chambers. Because all the noise that comes is designed to do one thing – stall capacity.

Users of payment systems and gateways are moving onto other options. And Bitcoin’s utility is now becoming almost entirely a store of value, and transmission of large value.

I have no doubt left in my mind now that there are elements within Blockstream that are seeking to destroy Bitcoin as we know it. I’m not saying this is unanimous across all Core devs, but it is undeniable that there are certain elements within that seek to change or destroy the fundamentals of this crypto.

When you are a developer, or a voice, and therefore viewed in some leadership capacity of a product (like Bitcoin), it becomes your responsibility to promote and to enhance your product. So when you tell a Core dev that the fees are unacceptable, and you are then told to “use fiat” instead, you have to wonder where the priorities lie.

Luke-jr is notorious for severing users from the eco-system. With responses like the above it is no wonder. It is not the answer one would expect from someone who is passionate and a believer of a product. Telling people to pay a $5 fee every time to avoid having payment issues is a sure way to get someone to never use your product again. But given we are more than halfway to that $5 mark, it seems people are going to have to pay more than that in no time.

Management of any other company would have long ago sacked any employee to speak of such a way of their product. Yet time and time again, Core devs seem to get away with murder, and yet they have the capacity to get rid of an honest bloke like Gavin Andresen, who gave them the very power they now have in the first place.

The UASF is just another method to stall any talk of another capacity increase. I’ve already written about how nothing will happen on August 1. I don’t believe Core were at any point serious about activating Segwit via a UASF – the idea is fraught with danger – to their detriment. But obstructionism is a thing Core devs are well versed at by now.

But Core need to realize, sooner or later, that the community has already decided to move on, with or without them. When half of the mined blocks don’t even come from your software anymore, it is a loud and clear message from the community telling you that you are doing something wrong.

Noteworthy, Silbert’s scaling agreement is a move that excludes Core. Even if it fails, it is an ominous warning altogether that the community will go forward without them.

Eli Afram
@justicemate

 

Recommended Bitcoin Fees Cross $3 per Transaction

I’m going to be straight out honest here. This is only going to get worse. And there is one group solely responsible for this – Blockstream’s Core developers.

Increasing capacity is such a simple flick of a switch, but Bitcoin Core developers insist that any such change would require six months of testing, and will require a ‘contentious’ hardfork, and all other forms of varying lies. And the reason that flicking this switch has become almost impossible is because some people, sadly, believe them.

It is by its sheer first mover advantage that Bitcoin remains a king among cryptos to date. While developers of other cryptocurrencies have taken the obvious moves of increasing on-chain capacity as a first measure, Bitcoin remains trapped in a Jurassic age of a 1MB artificial limit, causing dangerous congestions.

It was over 90% of the DASH community that agreed to hardfork to a 2MB. There was nothing ‘dangerous’ about that hardfork whatsoever. Despite all the rhetoric we hear from Core’s echo chambers about how ‘dangerous’ a hardfork is.

Newcomers, hardforks may sound scary, but this is how upgrades are done in the land of cryptos. In my many debates I’ve been told “Oh, but Bitcoin has a much bigger marketcap, and is much riskier to hardfork”, which is a ridiculous argument. Funny that Ethereum has half of the Market Cap that Bitcoin has (and much more than BTC had last year), and yet the Ethereum community is certainly not afraid to deploy a series of hardforks to correct any matters that require attention.

Other coins are even more adventurous, such as Monero, having a dynamic blocksize which adjusts organically with demand – it’s not rocket science to ease capacity. The problems of the network today could have been resolved years ago, had the warning signs been heeded.

It’s time to call the lies, and ignore the endless rhetoric that comes from the chambers. Because all the noise that comes is designed to do one thing – stall capacity.

Users of payment systems and gateways are moving onto other options. And Bitcoin’s utility is now becoming almost entirely a store of value, and transmission of large value.

I have no doubt left in my mind now that there are elements within Blockstream that are seeking to destroy Bitcoin as we know it. I’m not saying this is unanimous across all Core devs, but it is undeniable that there are certain elements within that seek to change or destroy the fundamentals of this crypto.

When you are a developer, or a voice, and therefore viewed in some leadership capacity of a product (like Bitcoin), it becomes your responsibility to promote and to enhance your product. So when you tell a Core dev that the fees are unacceptable, and you are then told to “use fiat” instead, you have to wonder where the priorities lie.

Luke-jr is notorious for severing users from the eco-system. With responses like the above it is no wonder. It is not the answer one would expect from someone who is passionate and a believer of a product. Telling people to pay a $5 fee every time to avoid having payment issues is a sure way to get someone to never use your product again. But given we are more than halfway to that $5 mark, it seems people are going to have to pay more than that in no time.

Management of any other company would have long ago sacked any employee to speak of such a way of their product. Yet time and time again, Core devs seem to get away with murder, and yet they have the capacity to get rid of an honest bloke like Gavin Andresen, who gave them the very power they now have in the first place.

The UASF is just another method to stall any talk of another capacity increase. I’ve already written about how nothing will happen on August 1. I don’t believe Core were at any point serious about activating Segwit via a UASF – the idea is fraught with danger – to their detriment. But obstructionism is a thing Core devs are well versed at by now.

But Core need to realize, sooner or later, that the community has already decided to move on, with or without them. When half of the mined blocks don’t even come from your software anymore, it is a loud and clear message from the community telling you that you are doing something wrong.

Noteworthy, Silbert’s scaling agreement is a move that excludes Core. Even if it fails, it is an ominous warning altogether that the community will go forward without them.

Eli Afram
@justicemate

 

Take Me To Your Leader

When taking the world order its best to make sure everybody is aligned behind one mantra and, indeed, one leader. But the key is a genuine leader rather than a dictator is one that has evolved and shown a natural resilience to rise above the competition.

In the world of cryptocurrency that has surely now happened. The reality is that Alt Coins are just stealing energy from Bitcoin. There have been plenty of bumps in the road but that would be no different with any other cryptocurrency as we saw recently in the case of the Ethereum smart contract error.

This is not taking delight in such glitches – no tech system is bulletproof – we are simply making the point that whichever solution you look at there will be problems as we saw recently with British Airways.

And this isn’t an attack on Ethereum either, it is merely stating the case for the crypto-community to get behind one coin in order to make a stronger impact on the established world order of banking and credit cards.

That said Bitcoin has a fixed volume whereas Ethereum can be diluted indefinitely which we certainly see as a disadvantage for ether and is another reason we think it’s time to rally round one. That one being Bitcoin.

The more mainstream Bitcoin can become the better and while some big brands like Starbucks and Expedia are already on-board we’d like to see Amazon and Alibaba join them so this petition for the FD of Amazon we think is worth supporting if you feel inclined to help the cause.

With governments across the globe now taking Bitcoin seriously and the likes of Japan, Russia, India, Antigua and Malta actually recognising Bitcoin we have, surely, found the heir apparent. To miss this opportunity by fragmenting (divide and conquer as ‘they’ will see it) appears to be little short of madness. Let’s jump on board one ship and set sail.